Mohd Azad Jasmi

By: Azad Jasmi

[Recommend this Fotopage] | [Share this Fotopage]
[<<  <  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  [10]  11  12  >  >>]    [Archive]
Saturday, 14-Oct-2006 03:58 Email | Share | | Bookmark
Oversteer - Part III

RWD - Full opposite lock in a Porsche
FWD oversteer.
4WD oversteer
So, if you are interested in the performance driving, kindly spare sometime to "play around"" with any standard specs car. Just try to instigate oversteer in order to bring you out of the box of a normal driving condition. Do it at a safe place.

What's the best way not to get into a skid? Avoid it in the first place! One of the best ways to avoid trouble on the road (not just skids) is to drive smoothly. True professionals drive so seamlessly that you do not feel anything when they shift, turn, or brake. Plan ahead, watch carefully, and slow down, especially if you are unfamiliar with the road. Skids almost always happen because the vehicle was running too fast for conditions.

Be careful when conditions might be slippery, as this is when most skids occur. But no matter what the road's surface condition is, skids are caused by driver error. Try to turn too sharply, enter a turn too quickly, or use excessive acceleration or braking, and you'll get the chance to practice skids! Keep your brakes maintained and properly adjusted, because a lateral imbalance in your brakes can cause or aggravate a skid.

There are two common types of skids. "Oversteer" (or fishtailing) occurs when your front wheels are taking a shorter path than desired and the rear-end breaks loose and fishtails. This is the result of power and side forces causing loss of traction on the rear wheels; there is too much power applied for the existing steering input and the resulting side forces cause the rear wheels to break free, often as a result of trying to accelerate out of a turn. "Understeer" (or plowing) occurs when you have too much steering input for the power you are applying (too sharp an angle between the tires and the direction of motion), and the front wheels skid ahead as a result.

Professional driving instructors advise a new way of teaching skid recovery, instead of the old rule, which was, "Turn into the skid." They say this "new" way is more understandable to non-professionals, but either way, they adamantly say the result is the same. This change was made because many folks didn't clearly understand what "turn into the skid" means.

If you find yourself in an over-steer skid, first thing to do is get off the gas, keep your foot off the brakes, or smoothly release brake pressure if already applied, and if you are driving a standard shift vehicle, disengage the clutch. Quickly turn the steering wheel in the direction you want the front of the car to go (down the road). Specifically, this means align your tires with the direction of your intended travel. As your vehicle turns back in the correct direction, you must then counter steer in time to stop the turning and stay on your desired path. If you do not do this promptly, the vehicle will continue to turn past your intended direction, and you may then skid in that direction. You may have to counter-steer more than once to get things under control.

There are two situations where the previous techniques could actually make the skid recovery more difficult. When you are driving either a front-wheel drive vehicle or a rear-wheel drive with the four-wheel drive engaged, a quick reduction on the accelerator can cause a result in a loss of control that mimics what happens when the brake pedal is depressed -- namely, the front wheels are slowed faster than the rear wheels increasing the over-steer skid problem. What is generally recommended is to place the vehicle into neutral (or depress the clutch) to allow the front wheels to coast as the vehicle is turned in the direction described above. My own experience is that control is much easier to reacquire by applying a steady pressure on the gas pedal as one "drives" out of the skid, but this assumes that the driver was traveling an appropriately slow speed to begin with.

For an under-steer skid, slightly reduce your steering input while slowing (without heavy braking) so you'll regain your directional control as the tires again grip the road surface. In this skid, the critical issue is to reduce speed so that you can regain a grip on the road and complete your turn. Even just a slight decrease in steering input, combined with the reduction in speed, may be enough to stop the skid from progressing.

These techniques are something you need to practice. If there are any high performance driving schools in your area, take advantage of the "safety" course they offer and you'll get the opportunity to practice skid recovery under safe, controlled conditions. You'll have a better idea of what to do, and a better idea of your own capabilities behind the wheel. I guarantee you will be a safer driver.

Regards,

Safety First,Last & Always

AZAD


Saturday, 14-Oct-2006 03:56 Email | Share | | Bookmark
Oversteer - Part II

Aerial view of Holden Performance Driving Centre
Mike Doohan testing Paul Morris's Touring Car
Skid Pad at the centre - Very fruitful training
I started learning drifting with numerous outings of oversteer cars. Had the experience to learn the Australia V8 SuperCar with Paul Morris Motorsports (www.paulmorris.com.au) when General Motors sent me for a high performance driving in Australia. They started with the normal Holden V8 with 380bhp and later put me in the 640bhp Australian V8 Touring Car. It's a beast! You can simply slide even at 160km/h with this car. Once you step on the throttle, the rear tyres will spin. Immense torque.The power is awesome. However, you can just slid with any car but please remember to play safe. I love the driving experience so much.

Below is the spec of the car .


The specs of the Australian V8 SuperCar


MAKE/MODEL : VZ Holden Commodore
CAPACITY : 600-bhp @ 7,500-rpm
CLUTCH : AP triple plate carbon clutch
GEARBOX : 6-speed H pattern Holinger
DIFFERENTIAL : 9-inch crownwheel (spool)
FRONT SUSPENSION : PMM designed and manufactured double wishbone with CNC billet uprights
REAR SUSPENSION : Live rear axle, watts linkage, rose joints, 4 link
FRONT BRAKES : 375mm disc, 48 vane, 24 slot, AP Racing UK 6-spot caliper (monoblock)
REAR BRAKES : 343mm, 48 vane, AP Racing UK 4-spot caliper (monoblock)
WHEELS : 17-inch x 11-inch Oz Racing wheels
TYRES : Dunlop 280/680 R17 Control slick and/or wet tyre
FUEL TANK : 120 litres
WEIGHT : 1,355kg (minimum weight)
COLOUR : black, orange, and silver


Regards,

Safety First, Last & Always,

AZAD


Thursday, 12-Oct-2006 09:04 Email | Share | | Bookmark
What is oversteer/opposite lock- Part I

Countersteer also known as Opposite Lock
When you can control your skid,you'll get addicted to it.
Salam & hello, this is different from drifting. Drifting is about controlled-skid or controlled-oversteer whereas skid is always unexpected.I'd like to shere something which I think can give you the idea on skidding. You'll get addicted with it once you can control the skid/the slide and later will bring you to another world called "Drifting".

AZAD


Thursday, 14-Sep-2006 13:49 Email | Share | | Bookmark
Drifting

Look at the drfit angle - Nicely done!
Oucch! This is not one of the techniques. T16 too much sideways.
One of the perfect cars for drifting - Fiat 131 Abarth
View all 8 photos...
I was introduced by one of my instructors on this technique. Tg Azizan of Proton Berhad or Bang Jan a.k.a. as Sifu introduced to me the technique years back, in 1999 when I was in the 1st batch of Proton Precision Driving Team. We have only 3 drivers back in 1999 - 2001 (Faidzil Alang - This year's MME Champion/Satria GTi Champion, Norhisham - Familiar face in Satria GTi Race, MME and Malaysian Super Series Races and yours truly). Tg Azizan can easily drift the Lotus Elise using some many techniques while he was actually explaining to me in the Elise; and with the smile on his face. My fidu is now recovering after the operation and InsyaAllah I'll be going be in my classsroom (Elise is my classroom) again and ready for my next syallabus.

Tg Azizan introduced me with Mr. Gavan Kershaw, the sideways champion in UK and he is currently the Vehicle Principle Dynamics Engineer at Lotus UK. Gavan brought me in the Lotus Elise on Sepang track and he did drift at all ( I mean ALL) turns at Sepang. It started from Turn 1 until turn 15 and he did it so easily and smooooooooth and faaaaaassssssssst! He was doing around 140-160 at some turns and they way he modulated the throttle and the techniques he was holding the steering were perfect. No jerking and I can still remember very vividly the way he did the scandinavian flick at turn 15 (at Sepang) before doing the 4 wheel drift. Right after my laps with Gavan, Datuk Mokhzani Mahathir requested gavan to show him the tricks in Datuk's Lotus 340R.

I personally think it's a pretty difficult technique to master. This is my personal view - Most people can drfit but not many people drift properly and I'm still learning this black art of driving. Why not we just learn the techniques together using some of the officially-known techniques"by the drifters.
______________________________________________________________________________________

Heel Toe Shifting (Double Clutching)

Heel toe shifting is a race shifting technique that allows drivers to downshift quickly while applying the brakes. Proper heal toe shifting keeps the engine, transmission, and wheel speed matched up so there is no jolt through the driveline while downshifting. When drifting, heel toe downshifting allows drivers to downshift in order to increase engine rpm, while braking to transfer weight forward and off the rear wheels.


1. Before entering a turn, do your initial braking to transfer your vehicle’s weight forward. Double clutch / heel toe downshift (see next step). Turn your wheels into the corner. Carry enough momentum into the corner to induce oversteer.


2. Clutch in, bring your vehicle into neutral, and release clutch. While on the brakes, slide your right heel over to the gas pedal and rev up (blip) the engine to match transmission and engine speed. Without matching revs on downshift, the engine speed will cause a jolt through the driveline, upsetting rear traction uncontrollably.


3. After matching revs, clutch in, and downshift your vehicle. Double clutching is optional, but reduces wear on your transmission. Use e-brake if momentum and downshift do not create enough oversteer.


4. Release the clutch, get off the brakes, and press the accelerator. Accelerate enough to keep tires spinning to continue oversteer. Add steering input (countersteering) to keep your vehicle from pivoting or spinning out

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Power Over Drift

1. Enter a turn at any speed. The powerover drift is based on horsepower so it does not necessarily need much speed or rotational force to perform.

2. Turn your wheels sharply into the turn, and get on the throttle enough to cause your wheels to lose traction. The cornering force of the vehicle combined with the excessive throttle will cause your vehicle to oversteer.

3. When you feel the vehicle’s rear end kicking out, immediately countersteer the wheels to face straight with the road. Your vehicle will pull in the direction of the front wheels, as long as the wheels are still moving. Keep on the throttle. If you press the brakes or let off the throttle because your vehicle is in an extremely oversteered condition, you will spin out or leave the road.

4. When you wish to straighten out your car, after completing the drift, let off the throttle smoothly and straighten out the wheels as your vehicle kicks in line behind the front tires

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Swaying Drift (using Scandinavian flick)

1. Enter a turn at medium to high speed to perform this drift.

2. Turn your wheels away from the turn.

3. Hold in the release button on your E-Brake / hand brake and pull up your brake sharply, then quickly release (e-brake is held up for only about 1 second). If using a RWD car, clutch in while pulling your E-Brake.

4. When you feel the vehicle’s rear end kicking out, immediately countersteer the wheels to face straight with the road. Your vehicle will pull in the direction of the front wheels, as long as the wheels are still moving. Keep on the throttle.

5. Your vehicle will now be sliding sideways in an angle away from the turn you wish to make.

6. When you want to turn your vehicle back into the direction of the turn you wish to make, let off the throttle quickly and completely. By letting off the throttle quickly, your vehicle will snap back in the opposite direction. Once your vehicle is at its desired angle, get on the throttle again to maintain the drift.

7. Let go of the steering wheel so that your vehicle's wheels line up with the road again. Countersteer if necessary.

8. If your vehicle begins to lose speed while sliding sideways, heel-toe downshift into a gear low enough to pull your vehicle through the drift.

9. When you wish to straighten out your car, after completing the drift, let off the throttle smoothly and straighten out the wheels as your vehicle kicks in line behind the front tires.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Long Slide Drift

1. Enter a turn at high speed to perform this drift.

2. Turn your wheels into from the turn.

3. Hold in the release button on your E-Brake and pull up your brake sharply, then quickly release (e-brake is held up for only about 1 second). If using a RWD car, clutch in while pulling your E-Brake.

4. When you feel the vehicle’s rear end kicking out, immediately countersteer the wheels to face straight with the road. Your vehicle will pull in the direction of the front wheels, as long as the wheels are still moving. Keep on the throttle.

5. If your vehicle begins to lose speed while sliding sideways, heel-toe downshift into a gear low enough to pull your vehicle through the drift.

6. When you wish to straighten out your car, after completing the drift, let off the throttle smoothly and straighten out the wheels as your vehicle kicks in line behind the front tires.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kansei Drift (Inertia Drift)

1. Enter a turn at high speed. The Kansei Drift should be performed at race speeds. (if you do not drift, your vehicle should experience severe understeer at this speed).

2. Turn your wheels sharply into the turn, and let off the throttle quickly. The cornering force of the vehicle combined with the loss of throttle will cause your vehicle to oversteer.

3. When your vehicle begins to lose traction, get on the throttle again quickly. This will overpower the wheels for the traction that is available, sending your vehicle into a drift.

4. When you feel the vehicle’s rear end kicking out, immediately countersteer the wheels to face straight with the road. Your vehicle will pull in the direction of the front wheels, as long as the wheels are still moving. Keep on the throttle. If you press the brakes or let off the throttle because your vehicle is in an extremely oversteered condition, you will spin out or leave the road.

5. When you wish to straighten out your car, after completing the drift, let off the throttle smoothly and straighten out the wheels as your vehicle kicks in line behind the front tires.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Braking Drift

1. Enter a turn at a speed too high for the vehicle to handle (if you do not drift, your vehicle should experience understeer at this speed).

2. Heel-Toe Downshift to get your vehicle into a gear low enough to cause the rear tires to break traction when you accelerate (2nd gear).

3. Turn your wheels sharply into the turn. By the time you finish downshifting and turning your wheels, you should be at the apex of the turn.

4. Accelerate hard, but balance the throttle to maintain the drift.

5. When you feel the vehicle’s rear end kicking out, immediately countersteer the wheels to face straight with the road. Your vehicle will pull in the direction of the front wheels, as long as the wheels are still moving. Keep on the throttle. If you press the brakes or let off the throttle because your vehicle is in an extremely oversteered condition, you will spin out or leave the road.

6. When you wish to straighten out your car, after completing the drift, let off the throttle smoothly and straighten out the wheels as your vehicle kicks in line behind the front tires.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Jump Drift

1. Enter a turn at medium speed.

2. Turn your wheels into the turn and stay on the throttle, but drive the inside wheels of your vehicle over a low curb.

3. When your rear wheel bounces over the curb, stay on the throttle. When your wheels return to the road, they should be spinning faster than what available traction can handle, causing your wheels to break traction. Stay on the throttle as your vehicle begins to drift.

4. When you feel the vehicle’s rear end kicking out, immediately countersteer the wheels to face straight with the road. Your vehicle will pull in the direction of the front wheels, as long as the wheels are still moving. Keep on the throttle. If you press the brakes or let off the throttle because your vehicle is in an extremely oversteered condition, you will spin out or leave the road.

5. When you wish to straighten out your car, after completing the drift, let off the throttle smoothly and straighten out the wheels as your vehicle kicks in line behind the front tires.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Feint Drift

1. On approach to a turn, steer your vehicle away from the direction of the turn you wish to be made. The distance you begin to turn your vehicle away from the turn depends on how fast you are traveling. When you turn your vehicle away from the direction of the turn you want to make, you are loading up your suspension on one side of your vehicle, compressing the springs so that when you turn in the opposite direction, your vehicle will "bounce" back to its desired direction.

2. Once your suspension is compressed on the side of your vehicle opposite of the turn you wish to make, quickly turn back in the opposite direction. This feint motion should be done smoothly, but not necessarily quickly. Turning your wheels too quickly in opposite directions will cause your vehicle to understeer.

3. After rebounding your vehicle back into its desired direction, get on the throttle. When combined with the rotational force of the rebound, the excessive throttle will send your vehicle into a drift. FWD vehicles can use the E-Brake instead of the throttle to induce oversteer.

4. When you feel the vehicle’s rear end kicking out, immediately countersteer the wheels to face straight with the road. Your vehicle will pull in the direction of the front wheels, as long as the wheels are still moving. Keep on the throttle. If you press the brakes or let off the throttle because your vehicle is in an extremely oversteered condition, you will spin out or leave the road.

5. When you wish to straighten out your car, after completing the drift, let off the throttle smoothly and straighten out the wheels as your vehicle kicks in line behind the front tires.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Dirt Drop Drift

1. Enter a turn at low to medium speed.

2. Turn your wheels into the turn and stay on the throttle, but drive slightly off the roadway with the side of your vehicle opposite of the turn you wish to make. (ex. if you are turning left, let your right side wheels drop into the dirt)

3. When your rear wheel goes off the roadway, the low traction surface should cause your wheels to break traction. Stay on the throttle as your vehicle returns to the roadway to continue the drift.

4. When you feel the vehicle’s rear end kicking out, immediately countersteer the wheels to face straight with the road. Your vehicle will pull in the direction of the front wheels, as long as the wheels are still moving. Keep on the throttle. If you press the brakes or let off the throttle because your vehicle is in an extremely oversteered condition, you will spin out or leave the road.

5. When you wish to straighten out your car, after completing the drift, let off the throttle smoothly and straighten out the wheels as your vehicle kicks in line behind the front tires

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Shift Lock Drift

1. Enter a turn at a speed too high for the vehicle to handle (if you do not drift, your vehicle should experience understeer at this speed).

2. Turn your wheels into the turn and quickly downshift into a lower gear (2nd gear).

3. By quickly downshifting (but not Heel-Toe Downshifting) you will put stress on the driveline, causing the vehicle to slow down and your engine rpms to increase.

4. After downshifting, quickly get on the throttle causing your wheels to break traction, sending your vehicle into a drift.

5. When you feel the vehicle’s rear end kicking out, immediately countersteer the wheels to face straight with the road. Your vehicle will pull in the direction of the front wheels, as long as the wheels are still moving. Keep on the throttle. If you press the brakes or let off the throttle because your vehicle is in an extremely oversteered condition, you will spin out or leave the road.

6. When you wish to straighten out your car, after completing the drift, let off the throttle smoothly and straighten out the wheels as your vehicle kicks in line behind the front tires

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Clutch Kick Drift

1. Enter a turn at a speed too high for the vehicle to handle (if you do not drift, your vehicle should experience understeer at this speed).

2. Turn your wheels into the turn and stay on the throttle.

3. At this speed, your vehicle should start to experience understeer. When this happens or right before this happens, clutch in, but stay on the throttle.

4. By clutching in and staying on the throttle, your engine will now rev up to high rpms. As soon as this happens, dump the clutch, causing your rear wheels to break traction.

5. When you feel the vehicle’s rear end kicking out, immediately countersteer the wheels to face straight with the road. Your vehicle will pull in the direction of the front wheels, as long as the wheels are still moving. Keep on the throttle. If you press the brakes or let off the throttle because your vehicle is in an extremely oversteered condition, you will spin out or leave the road.

6. When you wish to straighten out your car, after completing the drift, let off the throttle smoothly and straighten out the wheels as your vehicle kicks in line behind the front tires.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

E-Brake Drift

1. Enter a turn at a speed too high for the vehicle to handle (if you do not drift, your vehicle should experience understeer at this speed).

2. Heel-Toe Downshift to get your vehicle into a gear low enough to pull you through a drift (2nd gear).

3. Turn your wheels sharply into the turn. By the time you finish downshifting and turning your wheels, you should be at the apex of the turn.

4. Hold in the release button on your E-Brake and pull up your brake sharply, then quickly release (e-brake is held up for only about 1 second). If using a RWD car, clutch in while pulling your E-Brake. If using a FWD car, keep on the throttle while pulling your E-Brake.

5. When you feel the vehicle’s rear end kicking out, immediately countersteer the wheels to face straight with the road. Your vehicle will pull in the direction of the front wheels, as long as the wheels are still moving. Keep on the throttle. If you press the brakes or let off the throttle because your vehicle is in an extremely oversteered condition, you will spin out or leave the road.

6. When you wish to straighten out your car, after completing the drift, let off the throttle smoothly and straighten out the wheels as your vehicle kicks in line behind the front tires.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Who is Gervan Kershaw?


Lotus 340R Long Term test Drive - Auto Express Car Review - 2002

Last month's evo had barely hit the shelves before Gavan Kershaw (Lotus's ace chassis development engineer) was on the phone with an answer to our tyre problems: 'Got just the tyre for you. Been testing alternatives to the A038 up here at Lotus and if it's excellent road grip you want with good wet weather performance you need Yokohama Advan Neovas. We fitted the 340R with A038's,' Kershaw continued, 'because they're the ultimate dry weather trackday tyre, thinking the car would never get used in the wet, what with no roof and so on. But that didn't account for the changeable British weather and so we've had another look at alternatives, and we've come up with these.'

What's interesting is that Yokohama actually finalise the spec of the tyres with Kershaw up at Hethel, tweaking compounds and construction according to Lotus's input. Gavan admits it's all a black art to him; he's just asked to set times and give feedback to the Japanese engineers. At the last test he was amazed he was 0.3sec quicker through one corner just because the radial belt construction was slightly different on one set compared with the other.

The net result of all this testing is that Yokohama now has specific tyres for Lotus ΂- just look for the tell-tale 'LTS' stamp on the tyre wall. They're worth searching for because the Elise in all its variants tends to be that much lighter than other cars so it can wear softer compound tyres than those suited to other, heavier machines.

As to the new tyres' performance; it's a guarded thumbs-up at the moment, since I've only covered around 200 miles with them and Gavan warned me that Yokohamas need a fair bit of running-in since they seem to stay greasier for longer than other makes. I can vouch for that as I had a quick blat round the Bedford Autodrome in the wet when they were just 150 miles old and they felt horrid compared with the A038s, which could generate surprising grip in the damp if there was no standing water about. So we'll have to do a decent mileage on the Yokos before a meaningful verdict. Well, Gavan can't have all the fun...

____________________________________________________________________________________________

www.dailysportscar.com

http://www.britishgt.com/driverbio.php?countkey=49

Gavan Kershaw Racing
One team that is taking the 2004 British GT Championship very seriously is Gavan Kershaw Racing. Despite the name, this is very much a collaboration between Gavan Kershaw and Barrie Whight, and stems from their time as competitors (and rivals) in the Lotus Road Sports Series. As we will see shortly, this collaboration is much more than the traditional car-owner / team relationship.

The two team principals have very different backgrounds, both in racing and professionally.

Gavan Kershaw has been around cars from an early age, having raced in Karts from the age of eight (and winning several junior British championships in the process). At 16, he fulfilled many a young man’s dream and began an apprenticeship with Group Lotus. Over the course of the next 15 years, he spent time in every department (at least four months in each; also spending six years on an engineering HND) and obtained a very thorough grounding in engineering, before specialising in ride and handling. He is now regarded as the face of Lotus, dominating the Autocar Sideways Challenge for a number of years (for an illustration of his skill, keep an eye on him during warm-up) and being sent all over the world to demonstrate handling. Indeed, shortly after the Donington race in April, he was flown out to China on company business.

If further evidence were required of Gavan’s reputation amongst the motoring world, then look no further than this quotation from Autocar (30.03.04), in an article comparing the Lotus Elise 111R with the Ferrari 360CS: “As for the regulars, though, we’d take Gavan Kershaw over Dario Benuzzi any day of the week. Largely thanks to Gav and co., the newly re-invigorated, Toyota-powered Lotus is probably the best road-going Lotus ever, certainly the most talented Elise.” Gavan raced for two seasons in the Lotus Road Sports Series and dominated the 2003 season. He also took part in two British GT races at the end of the year.

Barrie Whight, in contrast, only began his involvement with motorsport three years ago, when he debuted in the Lotus Road Sports Series at Oulton Park. While he has gone on record as stating that he became a racing driver to impress women (a tongue-in-cheek statement stemming from a radio poll he heard on the way to his first race), Barrie is very serious indeed about his racing, his hobby rapidly becoming a passion. Barrie was a regular in the Lotus series and achieved his first race win at Donington Park in 2003, something that indicated further to his father, Paul, that he did indeed have potential as a racing driver. By this time, the link-up with Gavan had already begun, with the latter prepping Barrie’s car in the series. As 2004 loomed, plans were laid for Barrie to race his father’s Exige (as raced in the 2003 BGT) in the 2004 Cup class, and the car was taken to Norfolk for a very thorough overhaul.

During the week, Barrie works as a project manager for P D Savills in London, but this does not prevent him playing a very active part in the team. As mentioned previously, this is no ordinary partnership. When Gavan agreed to prepare the Lotus for the 2004 Cup class, he insisted that Barrie be involved in every stage of the car’s (and team’s) progress. If the car was to break down, then Barrie needed to understand why it had happened. Conversely, if the car was to run quickly and reliably, then he had to understand why that was, too. Barrie readily agreed to this.

Over the winter, the team stripped the car down to its component parts and went about the business of rebuilding it. It helps, of course, that a number of the team are also Lotus employees and know the car well: but what makes this whole project extraordinary is that every penny available goes directly on the car’s development – nobody in the team is paid a bean. This does not do their social lives any favours (the car comes first with every member of the team and most free hours are spent in the workshop), but it does mean that an incredible number of man-hours go into the build. An example of what this can result in is the fact that ten kilos were pared from the car’s weight, simply by rewiring.







Tuesday, 12-Sep-2006 09:01 Email | Share | | Bookmark
History of LFB - Interview with Mr. Rauno Aaltonen (The pioneer)

Mr. Rauno Aaltonen
LFB in this wonderful masterpiece will be overwhelming.
High speed, in 3rd, left 5 open & LFB will bring the tail out
View all 7 photos...
It is an excerpt from the interview. I get this from the website. Mr. Aaltonen is currently the instructor for Mini, worldwide. He is known as one of the pioneers of LFB technique, together with Mr. Timo Makinen (and not Timo Salonen or Tommy Makinen).

Rauno Aaltonen on Left Foot Braking
reprinted from Goblins Gazette Vol II, No 4, (Dec '68/Jan '69)
(If you know the original source of this article, please contact me)

Rauno Aaltonen, 1965 Rally champion of Europe, explains this highly specialised technique to Wilson McComb, BMC Competitions Press Officer.


McC: Every time rally enthusiasts get together nowadays, sooner or later you will find them talking about left-foot braking. It is a technique which we associate particularly with Scandinavian and Finnish drivers, and their use of it is perhaps one of the reasons why they seem to be unbeatable in international rallies. How did you first hear of it Rauno?

A: About four years ago I heard a rumour that the big boys, like Erik Carlsson, were using left-foot braking, but it seemed impossible to get any details. I couldn't find anyone to explain it to me, and Erik himself said he he was not using it. So I had to learn it for myself. At first it made me much slower, because although the technique is not easy, it is certainly convenient. If you panic when you find yourself going too fast into a corner - and of course, you have a minor panic every time you go too fast into a corner! - it is very tempting to use the brake too much and too often if you have learned a convenient way of doing it. But now, after much practice, I think I have perfected left-foot braking.

McC: Does the technique apply exclusively to front wheel drive cars? Or is it better or more effective with FWD?

A: No, not at all. It has advantages when driving both types, but the advantages are different.

McC: Perhaps, then, we should consider them seperately, especially as they react quite differently when one enters a corner too fast. In general, I think we can say that a front-drive car will understeer, whereas a rear-drive car will oversteer; it is the tail which will break away first when you go over the limit. Let's start with the front-drive car, since you have achieved most of your rally success with a front-drive Mini Cooper. And let us emphasise that throughout this discussion we are considering entering corners far too fast; that is; at speeds altogether higher than any sane driver would use on public roads. You are driving your Mini Cooper over a special stage of a rally, a closed section of mountain pass or forest track where all competitors are timed and the fastest man wins. How do you approach the corners?

A: Well, some people always throw the car sideways before a corner. (cf. Roger Clark) It helps to reduce the speed quickly at the last moment, and of course it looks very impressive for the spectators! But when you are driving fast over an unknown road, nine corners out of ten look slower than they really are. So my technique, quite simply, is to go into every corner a little faster than the speed which appears to be the maximum for each one. This means in that practice, nine corners go just right but on the tenth one I find I am going too fast. By the time I have realised this, it is much too late to throw the car sideways - there is no more time for that. I am going off the road - straight off with the front end, you understand. Now I keep the steering wheel position just the same, and I keep the accelerator still hard down, but very quickly I hit the brake pedal hard with my left foot - I don't keep it down, I just hit it. This causes the rear wheels to lock before the front wheels, because the rear wheels are running free and the front ones are being driven by the engine. Now, locked wheels have very little grip, so the tail begins to slide out, the car turns on its axis, and you can continue through the corner, still on the road instead of using the ditch. I could do exactly the same thing with the handbrake, but I haven't time to take my hands off the steering wheel to use it. Also the handbrake is seldom so efficient.

McC: But all this must happen very, very quickly - the whole thing must be over in a fraction of a second?

A: Very true. This means you must have your left foot ready all the time, and then it becomes a great temptation to use it all the time. We used to say that if you have a close rival who is almost beating you on rallies, you must teach him left-foot braking - then he will not trouble you again for one whole season! When it is so easy to slow your speed at any moment, it happens that you start braking on the straights, too hard before the corner, on every corner. So you become too slow. Also, I have known cases where brakes have been burnt out completely in 20 miles by using them too much in this way. When trying to learn left-foot braking, many drivers are still accelerating with the right foot as they start initial braking for the corner with the left foot. This is nonsense - and besides, it is giving you most braking from the rear wheels at a time when the weight of the car is being thrown forwards. So at first I think it is better to use the right foot for initial braking. When you start accelerating through the corner, move the left foot from the clutch to the brake, to be ready in case you want to throw the tail out. Later, you can use the left foot for your straight line braking as I do.

McC: Now let's consider how left foot braking can be applied to a rear-drive car. Again, you are entering the corner too fast. What happens?

A: Normally, just before a corner you must get the car to drift slightly - and I mean slightly; I am very strictly against oversteering cars, which are going to much sideways. Let us say this car is perfect in handling - not oversteering, not understeering - it is neutral. So by putting full power on before the corner you have it drifting slightly, with the tail out a little. But now you find you have estimated the speed wrongly and the tail is going out more. You correct by steering the opposite way, but soon you will come to the full lock position - you cannot correct any more. And the car will be starting to spin. Now this is where you use the left foot instead of the steering wheel. Just before you reach the full lock position, and still keeping the power on to the rear wheels, you hit the brake pedal quite hard with your left foot. The front wheels lock and slide, so the front of the car comes back to the right direction for the corner.

McC: In fact, this is the exact reverse of the effect achieved with the FWD car?

A: Yes, but there are other advantages, too. When you are drifting nicely, with equal grip for all four wheels, it often happens that the inside rear wheel starts to lift. If you have no limited-slip differential, this wheel will immediately start to spin - and then you will lose all driving power to the other wheel. By using the left foot on the brake you can stop the inside wheel spinning and make more torque go to the outside wheel. It sounds very strange but it is true. Another advantage, for all cars, is this. With the brakes on; you cause a certain twist in the suspension which locks the joints and makes them stiffer. This makes the car more stable - there is less roll, it does not bounce and sway too much. That is very important.

McC: What advice would you give to the ordinary motorist who would like to learn the technique of left-foot braking in corners?

A: I have tried to explain that it is really quite difficult. A friend of mine in Finland, who tried it when cornering one day, unfortunately landed in a tree. Another friend in England, who make some experiments when driving in traffic, drove into the back of a very large bus. Please, if anyone is doing it, choose a place which is very quiet and far away from other cars, or there may be some nasty surprises.


[<<  <  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  [10]  11  12  >  >>]    [Archive]

© Pidgin Technologies Ltd. 2016

ns4008464.ip-198-27-69.net